Speakers

MIT ADT

MIT ADT

The MIT Asian Dance Team is a student organization established in 2009 to spread the culture and love of East Asian dance, from classical and ethnic Chinese dances to modern Korean, Japanese, and Chinese pop. ADT currently has over 250 members consisting of MIT students and affiliates. For more information, check out our website at adt.mit.edu or our Instagram @mitasiandanceteam.

Alan Edelman

Alan Edelman

Alan Edelman is a Professor of Applied Mathematics, and, in 2004, founded Interactive Supercomputing (acquired by Microsoft). He received the B.S. & M.S. degrees in mathematics from Yale in 1984 and the Ph.D. in applied mathematics from MIT in 1989 under the direction of Lloyd N. Trefethen. Following a year at Thinking Machines Corp and at CERFACS in France, Edelman went to U.C. Berkeley as a Morrey Assistant Professor and Lewy Fellow, 1990-93. He joined the MIT faculty in applied mathematics in 1993. Edelman’s research interests include high performance computing, numerical computation, linear algebra and stochastic eigenanalysis (random matrix theory). He has consulted for Akamai, IBM, Pixar, and NKK Japan among other corporations. A Sloan fellow, Edelman received an NSF Faculty Career award in 1995. He has received numerous awards, among them the Gordon Bell Prize and Householder Prize (1990), the Chauvenet Prize (1998), the Edgerly Science Partnership Award (1999), the SIAM Activity Group on Linear Algebra Prize (2000), and the Lester R. Ford Award, (2005). In 2011, Edelman was selected a Fellow of SIAM, “for his contributions in bringing together mathematics and industry in the areas of numerical linear algebra, random matrix theory, and parallel computing.” Edelman was named a 2018 Fellow of the IEEE for his “contributions to the development of technical-computing languages,” namely the Julia language for numerical/scientific computing.

Alex 'Sandy' Pentland

Alex 'Sandy' Pentland

Professor Alex ‘Sandy’ Pentland directs MIT Connection Science, an MIT-wide initiative, and previously helped create and direct the MIT Media Lab and the Media Lab Asia in India. He is one of the most-cited  computational scientists in the world, and Forbes recently declared him one of the “7 most powerful data scientists in the world” along with Google founders and the Chief Technical Officer of the United States.  He is on the Board of the UN Foundations’ Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data, co-led the World Economic Forum discussion in Davos that led to the EU privacy regulation GDPR, and was central in forging the transparency and accountability mechanisms in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.  He has received numerous awards and prizes such as the McKinsey Award from Harvard Business Review, the 40th Anniversary of the Internet from DARPA, and the Brandeis Award for work in privacy.

He is a member of advisory boards for the UN Secretary General and the UN Foundation,  and the American Bar Association, and previously for Google, AT&T, and Nissan.   He is a serial entrepreneur who has co-founded more than a dozen companies including social enterprises such as the  Harvard-ODI-MIT DataPop Alliance . He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and leader within the World Economic Forum.

Over the years Sandy has advised more than 70 PhD students. Almost half are now tenured faculty at leading institutions, with another one-quarter leading industry research groups and a final quarter founders of their own companies. Together Sandy and his students have pioneered computational social scienceorganizational engineeringwearable computing (Google Glass), image understanding, and modern biometrics. His most recent books are Social Physics, published by Penguin Press, and Honest Signals, published by MIT Press.

Interesting experiences include dining with British Royalty and the President of India, staging fashion shows in Paris, Tokyo, and New York, and developing a method for counting beavers from space.

Alex Slocum

Alex Slocum

Alexander H. Slocum is the Pappalardo Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. Alex has written two books on machine design Precision Machine Design and FUNdaMENTALs of Design (free download on http://pergatory.mit.edu), published more than 150 papers, and has 116+ issued patents. Alex regularly works with companies on the development of new products and has been significantly involved with the invention and development of 11 products that have been awarded R&D 100 awards.

Alex is a Fellow of the ASME and the recipient of the Society of Manufacturing Engineer’s Frederick W. Taylor Research Medal, ASME Leonardo daVinci Award, the ASME Machine Design Award, and the Association of Manufacturing Technology Charlie Carter Award.

Alex’s areas of interest broadly include precision machine design as applied to machines and instruments for agriculture, healthcare, energy and water systems. He also seeks to help Fellows identify symbiotic opportunities where one system’s problem can be another system’s opportunity.

Barbara Liskov

Barbara Liskov

Liskov is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Association for Computer Machinery. She received The Society of Women Engineers’ Achievement Award in 1996 and the IEEE von Neumann medal in 2004. At the ACM SIGPLAN Programming Languages Design and Implementation Conference in 2008, she was awarded the Programming Languages Achievement Award. In 2009, she received the A.M. Turing Award from ACM.

MIT Bhangra

MIT Bhangra

We are a group of individuals from MIT and the Boston area who love Bhangra and are dedicated to exhibiting the energy and excitement that comes with it! Bhangra is a high-energy and upbeat folk dance from the state of Punjab in Northern India. It has grown in style and popularity over the years and today bhangra is celebrated on an international, competitive circuit.

Cady Coleman

Cady Coleman

Cady Coleman is a scientist, wife, mother, pilot, musician, retired NASA Astronaut and a veteran of two Space Shuttle missions and a six-month trip aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Passionate about sharing her experiences aboard the ISS, Coleman delivered the introductory talk for TED2011 from space.

Coleman currently serves as University Explorer at Arizona State University and as a consultant for a wide range of space-related projects. Her first Space Shuttle mission set the stage for astronauts to conduct pioneering research aboard the ISS in materials science, biotechnology, combustion science and fluid physics. Launching the Chandra X-Ray Observatory was the focus of her second mission, making it possible for scientists everywhere to learn about black holes and dark matter. During her space station expedition, Coleman was the Lead Robotics and Lead Science officer, performing hundreds of science experiments and the second-ever robotic capture of a supply ship from the station. During her ISS mission, she and her crew coached actress Sandra Bullock in preparation for Bullock’s role in the movie Gravity.  

On the ground at NASA, Coleman served in a variety of roles within the Astronaut Office, including Chief of Robotics, lead for tile repair efforts after the Columbia accident, and, most notably, the lead astronaut for the integration of supply ships. She paved the way for commercial spaceflight collaborations that are now commonplace. 

Before retiring from NASA, Coleman led open-innovation and public-private partnership efforts for the Office of the Chief Technologist at NASA Headquarters. As a volunteer test subject for the US Air Force centrifuge program, she set several human endurance/tolerance records while performing physiological and new equipment studies.

In addition to her role as University Explorer at ASU, Coleman is a research affiliate at the MIT Media Lab. She serves on several boards, including the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Earthrise Alliance, Dent the Future, Skycatch and Greenfield Community College.

Coleman earned a BS in chemistry from MIT in 1983 and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts in 1991. She is married to glass artist Josh Simpson, has two sons, Josiah and Jamey, and calls Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts her home. In their spare time, Coleman and Josh share a love of flying, diving and the exploration of new worlds right here on earth.

Cathy Wu

Cathy Wu

Cathy Wu works at the intersection of machine learning, optimization, and large-scale urban systems and other societal systems. Her recent research focuses on mixed autonomy systems in mobility, which studies the complex integration of automation such as self-driving cars into existing urban systems. She is broadly interested in developing principled computational tools to enable reliable and complex decision-making for critical societal systems.

She received her B.S. and M.Eng in EECS at MIT in 2012 and 2013, and a Ph.D. in EECS at UC Berkeley in 2018. She has received numerous fellowship, best paper, and teaching awards. Throughout her career, Cathy has collaborated and worked broadly across fields, including transportation, computer science, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, urban planning, and public policy, and institutions, including Microsoft Research, OpenAI, the Google X Self-Driving Car Team, AT&T, Caltrans, Facebook, and Dropbox. As the founder and Chair of the Interdisciplinary Research Initiative within the ACM Future of Computing Academy, she is actively building international programs to unlock the potential of interdisciplinary research in computing.

Catherine McCartin

Catherine McCartin

Catherine McCartin, senior lecturer at Massey University and co-owner of a beef and sheep farm explains how New Zealand farming must change from animal based farming to plant based. New laws require the improvement fish water quality and a reduction in methane emissions from livestock. While the country is most efficient producing meat and milk it must adjust the ratio of animal based farming to plant based farming to meet the requirements made by these laws. The repurposing of New Zealand farm land from animal based to plant based will greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and make the landscape more habitable to aquatic wildlife as well as land based animals and birds. Senior lecturer at Massey University and co-owner of a beef and sheep farm.

Daniel Jackson

Daniel Jackson

Daniel Jackson is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, associate director of CSAIL, and a MacVicar Fellow. He leads the Software Design Group. He received an MA from Oxford University in Physics, and his SM and PhD from MIT in Computer Science. He was a software engineer for Logica UK Ltd. and Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University before joining the MIT faculty in 1997.

He has broad interests in software engineering, especially in development methods, design and specification, formal methods, and safety critical systems.

Daniela Rus

Daniela Rus

Daniela Rus is the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT. Rus’ research interests are in robotics, artificial intelligence, and data science.

The focus of her work is developing the science and engineering of autonomy, toward the long-term objective of enabling a future with machines pervasively integrated into the fabric of life, supporting people with cognitive and physical tasks. Her research addresses some of the gaps between where robots are today and the promise of pervasive robots: increasing the ability of machines to reason, learn, and adapt to complex tasks in human-centered environments, developing intuitive interfaces between robots and people, and creating the tools for designing and fabricating new robots quickly and efficiently. The applications of this work are broad and include transportation, manufacturing, agriculture, construction, monitoring the environment, underwater exploration, smart cities, medicine, and in-home tasks such as cooking.

Rus serves as the Associate Director of MIT’s Quest for Intelligence Core, and as Director of the Toyota-CSAIL Joint Research Center, whose focus is the advancement of AI research and its applications to intelligent vehicles. She is a member of the Toyota Research Institute advisory board.

Rus is a Class of 2002 MacArthur Fellow, a fellow of ACM, AAAI and IEEE, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is the recipient of the 2017 Engelberger Robotics Award from the Robotics Industries Association. She earned her PhD in Computer Science from Cornell University.

Rus has also worked on two collaborative projects with the Pilobolus Dance company at the intersection of Technology and Art. Seraph, a pastoral story about human-machine friendship, was choreographed in 2010 and performed in 2010-2011 in Boston and New York City. The Umbrella Project, a participatory performance exploring group behavior, was choreographed in 2012 and performed at PopTech 2012, in Cambridge, Baltimore, and Singapore.

Darya Guettler

Darya Guettler

Darya Guettler is a Junior (Class of 2021) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is majoring in Course 2 (Mechanical Engineering) and 17 (Political Science). Coming from Germany and the United States, she became interested in the field of sustainability because of her aunt, but decided to pursue her passions in the field because Climate Change is “such a real threat to the world,” and she thinks that we need as many people as possible working on mitigating it.

 

Darya is the co-president of the Undergraduate Energy Club. She is a member of the MIT Symphony Orchestra, the MIT Climate Action Team and the Solar Electric Vehicle Team, and has spent her summer interning at Tesla Energy. In her free time, she likes hiking, watersports, performing in her Indie-Rock band, and visiting new countries.

Dava Newman

Dava Newman

Dava is the Apollo Professor of Astronautics and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, MA. She previously served as Deputy Administrator of NASA under the Obama administration, from May 2015 until January 2017. Dava’s research has included space flight experiments, ground-based simulations and mathematical modeling. Some of her recent projects have focused on space suit design, dynamics and control of astronaut motion, mission analysis and engineering systems design, and policy analysis. Dava is perhaps best known for her work on the “Bio-Suit,” a space activity suit that provides pressure by tension in the suit’s textile weave instead of with pressurized gas, resulting in greater comfort and ease of movement for astronauts wearing the suit. She has published extensively and holds a Ph.D. in aerospace biomedical engineering from MIT, M.S. degrees in aerospace engineering and technology and policy from MIT, and a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame.

David McGee

David McGee

David McGee’s paleoclimate research focuses on understanding how precipitation patterns respond to climate change. Using natural climate archives such as lake deposits, stalagmites, and deep-sea sediments, his group reconstructs water availability in past climates in order to test theories and models used to project future changes. David is also the Director of the Terrascope First-Year Learning Community at MIT, which engages first-year undergraduates in student-led exploration of challenges related to sustainability and the environment. He received his bachelor’s degree from Carleton College, then taught secondary school science for seven years prior to obtaining a master’s degree from Tulane University and a Ph.D. in Earth and Environmental Sciences from Columbia University. David was a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Minnesota before joining MIT’s faculty in 2012.

Elazer Edelman

Elazer Edelman

Elazer R. Edelman, M.D., Ph.D., is the Edward J. Poitras Professor in Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Senior Attending Physician in the coronary care unit at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He and his laboratory have pioneered basic findings in vascular biology and the development and assessment of biotechnology. Dr. Edelman directs MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) and Clinical Research Center (CRC) as well as the Harvard-MIT Biomedical Engineering Center (BMEC) – all dedicated to applying the rigors of the physical sciences to elucidate fundamental biologic processes and mechanisms of disease.

Dr. Edelman received Bachelor of Science degrees in Bioelectrical Engineering and in Applied Biology from MIT, a Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from MIT, a Ph.D. in Medical Engineering and Medical Physics from MIT, and an M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School. His graduate thesis work, under the direction of Prof. Robert Langer, defined the mathematics of regulated and controlled drug delivery systems. After internal medicine training and clinical fellowship in Cardiovascular Medicine at the BWH he spent six years as a research fellow in the Department of Pathology at Harvard Medical School with Prof. Morris J. Karnovsky working on the biology of vascular repair.

His research interests meld his medical and scientific training to better understand underlying biology for application towards improved clinical decision making and device design. For example, his work examining the cellular and molecular mechanisms that produce atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease led to the development and optimization of the first bare-metal stents, as well as subsequent iterations on the technology including drug-eluting stents.

Through a focus on understanding how tissue architecture and biochemical regulation contribute to local growth control, Edelman and his students were among the first to validate that proliferative vascular diseases are the sum of effects from endogenous growth promoters and suppressors. Their characterization of how heparin-like compounds serve as suppressors and heparin-binding growth factors as promoters contributed to the creation of a rigorous framework by which to appreciate how these agents interact with one another in-vivo. This work and advanced studies of endothelial cell and vascular biology led to the discovery the mutable dynamic of vascular endothelial state and its importance in tissue paracrine and angiocrine regulation in vascular diseases and now cancer. To apply their work, the group reasoned that the optimal way to control a biologic event was by recapitulating natural means of regulation. Hence, polymeric controlled drug delivery systems should mimic natural release systems, and vascular implants should be devised with an intimate knowledge of the injury they induce. The development and mathematical characterization of perivascular and stent-based drug delivery is an example of the former, and design of an endovascular and drug-eluting stent from first principles and therapeutic tissue engineered endothelial cell constructs is an example of the latter. More recently, these principles have been applied towards the development of novel mechanical organ support and heart valves.

Many of his findings have been or are now in clinical trial validation. More than 300 students and postdoctoral fellows have passed through Dr. Edelman’s laboratory enabling publication of over 680 original scientific articles and some 80 patents.

Dr. Edelman is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the Association of University Cardiologists, the American Society of Clinical Investigation, American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Inventors, the Institute of Medicine/National Academy of Medicine, and the National Academy of Engineering. As Chief Scientific Advisor of Science: Translational Medicine he has set the tone for the national debate on translational research and innovation. As co-founder of ASTM F04.03 he helped create standards for cardiovascular implants. He served as a member of FDA’s Science Board and an ORISE fellow in the FDA EIR. For his work bringing cardiovascular translational research to an international level of excellence, the Spanish Parliament and King Juan Carlos awarded Dr. Edelman with the Spanish Order of Civil Merit for his work. Most importantly, Elazer is an avid ice hockey goalie, and with his wife Cheryl are parents to comedian and writer Alexander, Olympic athlete AJ, and Austin. 

Hamsa Balakrishnan

Hamsa Balakrishnan

Hamsa Balakrishnan is the Bisplinghoff Professor and Associate Department Head of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Before joining MIT, she was at the NASA Ames Research Center, after receiving her PhD from Stanford University and a B.Tech. from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras. Her research is in the design, analysis, and implementation of control and optimization algorithms for large-scale cyber-physical infrastructures, with an emphasis on air transportation systems. Her contributions include airport congestion control algorithms, air traffic routing and airspace resource allocation methods, machine learning for weather forecasts and flight delay prediction, and methods to mitigate environmental impacts.

Hane Lee

Hane Lee

Hane Lee is a master’s student in the MIT Media Lab’s Opera of the Future and amateur pianist specializing in classical-contemporary music. Hane’s research interests include self discovery and identity exploration through music, immersive musical experiences, and layered soundscapes. Much of their inspiration comes from many philosophy and political identity texts, their classical-contemporary piano practice, and their math-heavy background. Recently, they have been wondering how to create a sense of freedom through sound. Hane holds an undergraduate degree from MIT in electrical engineering with a minor in music.

Hilary Vogelbaum

Hilary Vogelbaum

Join Hilary Vogelbaum, an MIT student whose passion for finding solutions to address climate change took her far out of her comfort zone–to an industry-sponsored offshore oil and gas drilling camp for college students. In our hyper polarized and politicized world, the idea that people with widely divergent viewpoints should still talk to each other is RADICAL. Hilary proves that even in the most unlikely places, we can pool our talents to find solutions to prevent catastrophic climate change. The climate problem is so big, everyone can, should and must be part of the solution. 

Juan Enriquez

Juan Enriquez

A broad thinker, Juan Enriquez bridges disciplines to build a coherent look ahead. He is the managing director of Excel Venture Management, a life sciences VC firm. He published (with Steve Gullans) Evolving Ourselves: How Unnatural Selection and Nonrandom Mutation Are Shaping Life on Earth. The book describes a world where humans increasingly shape their environment, themselves and other species. Enriquez cofounded the company that made the world’s first synthetic life form, and seed funded a company that may allow portable brain reading.

Judy Brewer

Judy Brewer

Getting online can give people access to science, technology, and the world of ideas. Over a billion people in the world have some kind of disability—but we’re still putting barriers in front of them in the online world. Inclusive design allows us to design better technologies that everyone can use.

Judy Brewer works on accessibility of the digital world at the World Wide Web Consortium’s Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI). The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines provide accessibility guidance for the web, on descriptions for images and video, captions for audio, interoperability for speech recognition, and sites that are easier to learn for people with cognitive disabilities. Accessibility is also important for mobile phones, digital books, online games, telepresence robots, virtual reality and more.

An international community of people working on digital accessibility is improving awareness, rights, and resources for accessibility. Accessibility is now recognized as part of corporate social responsibility and as an innovation driver; and these changes are contributing to improvements in products and services.

But we need many more hands at the table, on everything from accessibility of town websites to leveraging machine learning. Learn more about this talk, and join us in building an accessible digital future at w3.org/WAI/ Director of the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)

Julie Shah

Julie Shah

Julie Shah is an Associate Professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT and leads the Interactive Robotics Group of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Shah received her SB (2004) and SM (2006) from the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT, and her PhD (2010) in Autonomous Systems from MIT. Before joining the faculty, she worked at Boeing Research and Technology on robotics applications for aerospace manufacturing. She has developed innovative methods for enabling fluid human-robot teamwork in time-critical, safety-critical domains, ranging from manufacturing to surgery to space exploration. Her group draws on expertise in artificial intelligence, human factors, and systems engineering to develop interactive robots that emulate the qualities of effective human team members to improve the efficiency of human-robot teamwork.

Karthish Manthiram

Karthish Manthiram

Karthish Manthiram is the Warren K. Lewis Career Development Professor in Chemical Engineering at MIT. His lab is focused on electrifying chemical manufacturing, so that air, water, and renewable electricity can be used to make diverse chemicals. Examples include converting air and water into fertilizers, fuels, and plastics. Karthish received his bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University and his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from UC Berkeley, and, most recently, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the California Institute of Technology. Karthish’s research and teaching have been recognized with several awards, including Forbes 30 Under 30 in Science, Dan Cubicciotti Award of the Electrochemical Society, 3M Nontenured Faculty Award, and the C. Michael Mohr Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching Award.

Krystyn Van Vliet

Krystyn Van Vliet

Professor Van Vliet’s group studies material chemomechanics: material behavior at the interface of mechanics, chemistry, physics, and biology. She focuses on thermodynamically metastable surfaces and interfaces, in which stress-assisted chemical reaction kinetics are notoriously difficult to analyze via either experiment or simulation. The mechanisms of this coupling in cell-material interactions are incompletely understood, due to both biological complexity and lack of appropriate experimental and computational tools, but are key to design of materials that modulate cell adhesion for drug uptake and differentiation. Her long-term goal is to predict and modulate key functions of biological cells by drawing analogies to the coupled chemical/mechanical behavior of structurally simpler, nonbiological material interfaces and nanocomposites. These integrated experimental and computational efforts include three main thrusts: (1) chemomechanical mapping of nanocomposite surfaces including living cells; (2) mechanics of amorphous and viscoelastic surfaces and nanostructures; and (3) chemical kinetics in mechanically strained, nanoscale material interfaces. Her group has used this interdisciplinary application of mechanical and chemical forces to rapidly map environment-structure-property relations in engineered materials, and to predict the binding kinetics of individual molecules on living cells. These studies have shown that the stiffness of materials to which molecular ligands are tethered can directly affect kinetics of ligand-receptor interactions at cell surfaces. Professor Van Vliet serves as the faculty supervisor of the DMSE Nanomechanical Technology Laboratory, has co-developed new undergraduate core classes, and has implemented new programs to retain underrepresented minority students.

Megan Smith

Megan Smith

Smith is an award-winning entrepreneur, engineer, and tech evangelist. Today Smith is CEO and founder of shift7, a company working collaboratively on systemic social, environmental and economic problems – finding opportunities to scout and scale promising solutions and solution makers and engage proven tech-forward, open, shareable practices to drive direct impact, together. Smith served as the third United States Chief Technology Officer from 2014-2017 helping the President and his teams harness the power of data, innovation and technology on behalf of the nation. Smith recruited top tech talent to serve across government collaborating on pressing issues, from data science, AI and open source, to inclusive economic growth and criminal justice reform. Her teams focused on broad capacity building by co-creating all-hands-on-deck initiatives, including the public-private program TechHire, the Computer Science for All initiative, and the Image of STEM campaigns.  

Smith was vice president at Google for eleven years leading new business development where she managed early-stage partnerships, pilot explorations and technology licensing across the global engineering and product teams; she led acquisitions of Google Earth, Maps, and Picasa;  led the Google.org transition to increase engineering adding Google Crisis Response, GoogleforNonProfits, Earth Outreach/Engine; and later was a VP in the Google[x] team where she co-created SolveForX and Women Techmakers. Earlier, Smith served as CEO of PlanetOut, worked on early smartphone technologies at General Magic and at Apple Japan. Smith is an advisor to the MIT Media Lab, Vital Voices, Thinkof-Us, LA Olympics 2028, the Malala Fund, which she co-founded. She was selected as a World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT and completed her master’s thesis work at the MIT Media Lab. Smith serves as a life member on the board of MIT and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the National Academy of Engineering. 

Mohamadou Bella Bah

Mohamadou Bella Bah

Mohamadou Bella Bah sees coordination problems everywhere. A Junior at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) majoring in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Bella’s research interests include artificial intelligence, multi-agent systems, and algorithms and controls for cyber-physical systems. Bella believes that many of today’s cyber-physical systems can be made fully autonomous; wherein, a human operator provides no additional instruction beyond providing the desired system state. Bella’s research addresses how to achieve coordination in networks that have numerous, diverse, and independent agents, through the interactions of autonomous and intelligent agents — particularly in the context of smart grids. Bella’s most recent project is a communications and services platform for smart grids that enables distributed energy resources to autonomously self-coordinate pursuant of demands made by a system operator.

Natalie Northrup

Natalie Northrup

Natalie is an undergraduate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Class of 2022) studying Systems Engineering and Economics. At MIT, Natalie does research with the MIT Energy Initiative, building a life cycle assessment tool to map pathway and systems emissions in Norway; is an Administrator for Waste Watchers, a group of undergraduates implementing waste education and intervention strategies across campus; and is a member of the Undergraduate Association Sustainability Committee, organizing the Annual Trash2Treasure Reuse Sale. She also competes with the Varsity Lightweight Women’s Crew Team and is active in the Outing Club. 

Natalie is interested in waste, energy and transportation systems, and hopes to use systems analysis and economics to develop policy tools for grid transformation, vehicle electrification, and waste diversion/repurposing.

Nergis Mavalvala

Nergis Mavalvala

Nergis Mavalvala is an American astrophysicist known for her role in the first observation of gravitational waves. She is the Curtis and Kathleen Marble Professor of Astrophysics at MIT, where she is also the Associate Head of the Department of Physics. She was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2010. Mavalvala is best known for her work on the detection of gravitational waves in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) project, but she has also obtained prominent results on other physics problems that evolved out of LIGO: for example, she has performed pioneering experiments on laser cooling of macroscopic objects and in the generation of squeezed quantum states of light. Professor Nergis Mavalvala received a B.A. from Wellesley College and a Ph.D. from MIT. She was a postdoctoral fellow and research scientist at the California Institute of Technology before joining the Physics faculty at MIT in 2002. She was appointed Associate Department Head of Physics in February 2015. In 2017, Mavalvala was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

Noelle Selin

Noelle Selin

Noelle Eckley Selin is Associate Professor in the Institute for Data, Systems and Society and the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is also the Director of MIT’s Technology and Policy Program. Her research uses atmospheric chemistry modeling to inform decision-making on sustainability challenges, including air pollution, climate change and hazardous substances such as mercury and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Her work also examines interactions between science and policy in international environmental negotiations and develops systems approaches to address sustainability challenges. She received her PhD from Harvard University in Earth and Planetary Sciences as part of the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling Group. Her M.A. (Earth and Planetary Sciences) and B.A. (Environmental Science and Public Policy) are also from Harvard University. Before joining the MIT faculty, she was a research scientist with the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change. Her articles were selected as the best environmental policy papers in 2015 and 2016 by the journal Environmental Science & Technology.  She is the recipient of a U.S. National Science Foundation CAREER award (2011), a Leopold Leadership fellow (2013-2014), Kavli fellow (2015), a member of the Global Young Academy (2014-2018), an American Association for the Advancement of Science Leshner Leadership Institute Fellow (2016-2017), and a Hans Fischer Senior Fellow at the Technical University of Munich Institute for Advanced Study (2018-2021).

MIT Ohms

MIT Ohms

We are the Ohms, MIT’s electrifying competitive South Asian a cappella group!

Really, we’re a pretty awesome group of people who love punny statements and pride ourselves on having the lowest time commitment on campus. Nevertheless, we have received plenty of praise for our creative arrangements, vocal talent, and upbeat spirit. We have been featured at MIT’s 150th Anniversary celebrations, MIT Campus Preview Weekend, and at our very first concert (Ohms: Resistance) in March 2011.

For us, the Ohms are a family. Though we started as just a really cool idea in Date Room B in McCormick Hall, we are who we are today because of a team effort. Every member of the Ohms has left a lasting imprint on our group, and we have created so many memories together. We collaborate, we’re efficient, we’re fun. We’re a little bit nerdy and little bit crazy, but that is why we love each other. Above all else, we love to sing and celebrate the richness of our culture. We are the Ohms, MIT’s electrifying competitive South Asian a cappella group! 

Paula Hammond

Paula Hammond

Professor Paula T. Hammond is the Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering and David H. Koch Chair Professor in Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She is a member of MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, the MIT Energy Initiative and a founding member of the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnology. She has recently been named the new head of the Department of Chemical Engineering (ChemE). She is the first woman and the first person of color appointed to the post. She also served as the Executive Officer (Associate Chair) of the Chemical Engineering Department (2008-2011).

Professor Hammond was elected into the 2013 Class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also the recipient of the 2013 AIChE Charles M. A. Stine Award, which is bestowed annually to a leading researcher in recognition of outstanding contributions to the field of materials science and engineering, and the 2014 Alpha Chi Sigma Award for Chemical Engineering Research. She was also selected to receive the Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer Teal Innovator Award in 2013. She has been listed in the prestigious Highly Cited Researchers 2014 list, published by Thomson Reuters in the Materials Science category. This list contains the world’s most influential researchers across 21 scientific disciplines based on highly cited papers in the 2002-2012 period. She is also included in the report: The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014.

Professor Hammond serves as an Associate Editor of the American Chemical Society journal, ACS Nano. She has published over 250 scientific papers and holds over 20 patents based on her research at MIT. She was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineers, and the American Chemical Society Polymer Division. In 2010, she was named the Scientist of the Year by the Harvard Foundation.

Professor Hammond received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from MIT in 1984, and her M.S. from Georgia Tech in 1988 and earned her Ph.D. in 1993 from MIT.

Ramesh Raskar

Ramesh Raskar

Ramesh Raskar is an Associate Professor at MIT Media Lab and directs the Camera Culture research group. His focus is on Machine Learning and Imaging for health and sustainability. They span research in physical (e.g., sensors, health-tech), digital (e.g., automated and privacy-aware machine learning) and global (e.g., geomaps, autonomous mobility) domains.</p> <p>At MIT, his co-inventions include camera to see around corners, femto-photography, automated machine learning (auto-ML), private ML (split-learning), low-cost eye care devices (Netra,Catra, EyeSelfie), a novel CAT-Scan machine, motion capture (Prakash), long distance barcodes (Bokode), 3D interaction displays (BiDi screen), new theoretical models to augment light fields (ALF) to represent wave phenomena and algebraic rank constraints for 3D displays(HR3D).</p> <p>In his recent role at Facebook, he launched and led innovation teams in Digital Health, Health-tech, Satellite Imaging, TV and Bluetooth bandwidth for Connectivity, VR/AR and 'Emerging Worlds' initiative for FB.</p> <p>Before MIT, he co-invented techniques for AR, Computational Photography, Shader Lamps (projector-AR), composite RFID (RFIG), multi-flash non-photorealistic camera for depth edge detection, quadric transfer methods for multi-projector curved displays.</p> <p>He received the Lemelson Award 2016 and ACM SIGGRAPH Achievement Award 2017, Technology Review TR100 award 2004 (which recognizes top young innovators under the age of 35), Global Indus Technovator Award (top 20 Indian technology innovators worldwide) 2003, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship award 2009 and Darpa Young Faculty award 2010. Other awards include Marr Prize honorable mention 2009, LAUNCH Health Innovation Award, presented by NASA, USAID, US State Dept+ NIKE, 2010, Vodafone Wireless Innovation Award (first place) 2011.</p> <p>His work has appeared in NYTimes, CNN, BBC, NewScientist, TechnologyReview and several technology news websites.</p> <p>His invited and keynote talks include TED, Wired, TEDMED, Darpa Wait What, MIT Technology Review, Google SolveForX and several TEDx venues.</p> <p>His co-authored books include Spatial Augmented Reality, Computational Photography and 3D Imaging (both under preparation).</p> <p>He has worked on special research projects at Google [X], Facebook, Apple and co-founded/advised several startups. He launched REDX.io, a platform for young innovators to explore AI-for-Impact. He frequently consults for dynamic organizations to conduct 'SpotProbing' exercises to spot opportunities and probe solutions.</p> <p>He holds 90+ US patents.

Raffaele Ferrari

Raffaele Ferrari

Raffaele Ferrari studies the circulation of the ocean, its impact on present and past climates, and its role on shaping biological productivity. His group combines observations, theory and numerical models to investigate the physics of the ocean and atmosphere from scales of centimeters to thousand of kilometers. 

 

Ferrari has PhDs in Oceanography (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 2000) and Fluid Dynamics (Politecnico di Torino, 1999). Before joining the faculty in 2002 he spent time as a postdoctoral scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Since 2012 Ferrari has been Director of the Program in Atmospheres, Oceans and Climate.

MIT Reso

MIT Reso

MIT Resonance is a co-ed a cappella group at MIT, whose mission is to explore the fine art of covering contemporary music hits of varying popularity armed only with our wits and a pitch pipe! Enjoy this video of us performing at TEDxMIT in December 2019. A special shout-out to senior Jenn Lu for her moving speech on the importance of doing work to fight climate change!

Retsef Levi

Retsef Levi

Retsef Levi is the J. Spencer Standish (1945) Professor of Operations Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is a member of the Operations Management Group at MIT Sloan and affiliated with the MIT Operations Research Center. Levi also serves as the Faculty Co-Director of the MIT Leaders for Global Operations (LGO).

Before coming to MIT, he spent a year in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center as the holder of the Goldstine Postdoctoral Fellowship. He received a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics from Tel-Aviv University (Israel) in 2001, and a PhD in Operations Research from Cornell University in 2005. Levi spent almost 12 years in the Israeli Defense Forces as an officer in the Intelligence Wing and was designated as an Extra Merit Officer. After leaving the Military, Levi joined an emerging new Israeli hi-tech company as a Business Development Consultant.  
 
Levi’s current research is focused on the design of analytical data-driven decision support models and tools addressing complex business and system design decisions under uncertainty in areas such as health and healthcare management, supply chain, procurement and inventory management, revenue management, pricing optimization and logistics. He is interested in the theory underlying these models and algorithms, as well as their computational and organizational applicability in practical settings.  Levi has been leading several industry-based collaborative research efforts with some of the major academic hospitals in the Boston area, such as Mass General Hospital (MGH), Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), Children’s Hospital, and across the U.S. (e.g., Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NYC Presbyterian Hospital System and the American Association of Medical Colleges). Levi was the PI on an MIT contract with the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) to develop systematic risk management approach to address risk related to economically motivated adulterations of food manufactured in global supply chains. With a multi-million award from the Walmart Foundation, Levi currently leads a multi-year U.S.-China collaborative effort to develop new predictive risk analytics tools and testing technologies and platforms to address core food safety challenges in China. Levi has also been involved in developing operational risk and process safety management methodologies for various organizations in the healthcare, pharmaceutical and oil industries. Levi received the NSF Faculty Early Career Development award, the 2008 INFORMS Optimization Prize for Young Researchers, the 2013 Daniel H. Wagner Prize and the 2016 Harold W. Kuhn Award.
 
Levi teaches regularly courses on operations management, analytics, risk management, system thinking and healthcare to students from various degree and non-degree programs including MBA, Executive MBA, PhD, Master and Undergraduate students as well as Executive Education programs. His Healthcare Lab course attracts students from across the MIT campus and engages major industry partners and leaders. Levi has graduated 10 PhD students, 34 Master students and 6 postdoctoral fellows. He was also awarded several prestigious teaching awards.

Ron Rivest

Ron Rivest

Professor Rivest is the Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and a leader of the Cryptography and Information Security research group within MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He received a B.A. in Mathematics from Yale University in1969, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1974.

He is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is also a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

 

Ronitt Rubinfeld

Ronitt Rubinfeld

Data is exploding in size. This is wonderful, as it allows us to achieve higher precision, more meaningful answers. On the other hand, large datasets also present a problem, as in many cases data sets are so large that it is impossible for standard algorithms to consider them in their entirety and answer in a reasonable amount of time. *Sublinear* algorithms allow a user to give meaningful answers after looking at only a miniscule fraction of the data. The goal of such algorithms is to allow one to swim, rather than sink, in our data! Join MIT Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Ronitt Rubinfeld in her fascinating and insightful talk. 

Ryan Allard

Ryan Allard

Ryan Allard is a transportation analyst with broad knowledge of transportation systems and their impact on climate. His specialties include passenger intermodality, intercity transport, competitive issues in transportation, and cooperation among transportation systems, on which he has published peer-reviewed research and presented at international conferences. In the past, Ryan worked as a consultant, aiding in the development of more effective government and state agencies. He has a PhD and MSc in Transportation Systems Analysis from the University of Lisbon, and a BS in Aerospace Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

MIT Syncopasian

MIT Syncopasian

Syncopasian is the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s co-ed East Asian music a cappella group. We celebrate East Asian pop culture at MIT through our eclectic a cappella repetoire featuring songs in English, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and other East Asian languages. Syncopasian is the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s co-ed East Asian music a cappella group. We celebrate East Asian pop culture at MIT through our eclectic a cappella repetoire featuring songs in English, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and other East Asian languages.

Talia Khan

Talia Khan

Talia Khan is a Senior (Class of 2020) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is majoring in Course 3 (Materials Science and Engineering) and 21M (Music). She is from Phoenix, AZ, and her passion for sustainability stems from her love of nature. She yearns to protect it from harm that may inhibit the continuation of life. Her hobby outside of protecting our planet includes being a Jazz Singer.

Tim Gutowski

Tim Gutowski

Timothy Gutowski is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has been on the faculty since 1981. His current area of study is focused on the climate change consequences and mitigation strategies for engineered systems including; manufacturing, transportation, buildings and energy systems. He attended college in Wisconsin (B.S. Mathematics, 1967), Illinois (M.S. Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, 1968) and Massachusetts (MIT, PhD Mechanical Engineering, 1981).  He has worked at Wiss, Janney, and Elstner (structural engineer) and Bolt, Berank and Newman (noise and acoustics consultant) and has taught mechanical engineering at the Escuela Politécnica Nacional in Quito, Ecuador, while he was in the Peace Corps. He has over 150 technical publications, three books, and seven patents and patent applications.  His most recent books are: Thermodynamics and the Destruction of Resources, (with Bhavik Bakshi and Dušan Sekulić ) Cambridge University Press 2011, and Advanced Composites Manufacturing, Wiley 1997. And in 1972 he wrote Conceptos Básicos de la Teoría de Vibraciones. 

Tom Peacock

Tom Peacock

Having received his B.Sc. (Physics) from Manchester University and D. Phil. (Physics) from Oxford University, Professor Thomas Peacock of the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT is the Director of the Environmental Dynamics Laboratory (ENDLab). His research group conducts field studies, laboratory experiments and modeling of environmental flows with an emphasis on ocean dynamics and transport. Professor Thomas Peacock received NSF and ONR sponsored projects, including recent studies in the Arctic Ocean, the Timor Sea, and the Western Pacific. Recently, he established a research program at MIT that studies scientific and societal aspects of deep-sea mining, with activities ranging from plume dynamic studies in the Pacific Ocean to the development of an international royalty payment regime for the International Seabed Authority.

Vibha Agarwal

Vibha Agarwal

Vibha is a fourth-year student studying Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, with a minor in Biomedical Engineering. Her passion for sustainability comes from her belief  that everyone has the right to basic needs, and that things like clean water, a safe environment, nutritious foods, and access to education are the key to helping people accomplish their personal goals. She loves learning about other communities, and is inspired by Tanzania’s move towards solar energy. At MIT Engineers Without Borders, she’s served as External Relations Manager, Electrical Team Lead, Technical Lead, and President; this club has given her amazing opportunities to grow as a leader and change-maker. (She’s also been involved with MIT D-Lab in the past. )

Vivenne Sze

Vivenne Sze

Vivienne Sze received the B.A.Sc. (Hons) degree in electrical engineering from the University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, in 2004, and the S.M. and Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, in 2006 and 2010 respectively. She received the Jin-Au Kong Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Prize for her Ph.D. thesis in electrical engineering at MIT in 2011. She is an Associate Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT. Her research interests include energy efficient algorithms and architectures for portable multimedia applications. From September 2010 to July 2013, she was a Member of Technical Staff in the Systems and Applications R&D Center at Texas Instruments (TI), Dallas, TX, where she designed low-power algorithms and architectures for video coding. She also represented TI in the JCT-VC committee of ITU-T and ISO/IEC standards body during the development of High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), which received a Primetime Emmy Engineering Award. She co-edited a book entitled High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) – Algorithms and Architecture (Springer, 2014). She was a recipient of the 2017 Qualcomm Faculty Award, 2016 Google Faculty Research Award, the 2016 AFOSR Young Investigator Research Program Award, the 2016 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award, the 2014 DARPA Young Faculty Award, the 2007 DAC/ISSCC Student Design Contest Award and a co-recipient of the 2017 CICC Best Invited Paper Award, the 2016 Micro Top Picks Award and the 2008 A-SSCC Outstanding Design Award.

Share This