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Our Talks

Over the past year, TEDxMIT grew into existence and has already produced over 30 different talks. Check out our conferences!

 

Our Speakers

TEDxMIT is proud to feature student, faculty, and alumni speakers from all parts of MIT and the surrounding community.

 

Our ORGANIZERS

TEDxMIT is a joint collaboration between MIT students, CSAIL faculty, and TEDx and surrounding professionals. Learn more below!

 

OUR FALL 2021 SPEAKERS

Jinhua Zhao

Jinhua Zhao

Jinhua Zhao is the Associate Professor of City and Transportation Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prof. Zhao brings behavioral science and transportation technology together to shape travel behavior, design mobility system, and reform urban policies. He develops methods to sense, predict, nudge, and regulate travel behavior and designs multimodal mobility systems that integrate automated and shared mobility with public transport. He sees transportation as a language to describe a person, characterize a city, and understand an institution and aims to establish the behavioral foundation for transportation systems and policies. 

Prof. Zhao directs the JTL Urban Mobility Lab and Transit Lab at MIT and leads long-term research collaborations with major transportation authorities and operators worldwide, including London, Chicago, Hong Kong, and Singapore. He is the co-director of the Mobility Systems Center of the MIT Energy Initiative, and the director of the MIT Mobility Initiative. He very much enjoys working with students.  

Cathy Wu

Cathy Wu

Cathy Wu works at the intersection of machine learning, optimization, and large-scale urban systems and other societal systems. Her recent research focuses on mixed autonomy systems in mobility, which studies the complex integration of automation such as self-driving cars into existing urban systems. She is broadly interested in developing principled computational tools to enable reliable and complex decision-making for critical societal systems.

She received her B.S. and M.Eng in EECS at MIT in 2012 and 2013, and a Ph.D. in EECS at UC Berkeley in 2018. She has received numerous fellowship, best paper, and teaching awards. Throughout her career, Cathy has collaborated and worked broadly across fields, including transportation, computer science, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, urban planning, and public policy, and institutions, including Microsoft Research, OpenAI, the Google X Self-Driving Car Team, AT&T, Caltrans, Facebook, and Dropbox. As the founder and Chair of the Interdisciplinary Research Initiative within the ACM Future of Computing Academy, she is actively building international programs to unlock the potential of interdisciplinary research in computing.

Daniela Rus

Daniela Rus

Daniela L. Rus is a Romanian-American roboticist, the Director of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), and Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Rus’ research interests include robotics, mobile computing and programmable matter. She is known for her work on self-reconfiguring robots, shape-shifting machines that have the ability to adapt to different environments by altering their internal geometric structure. They do this on their own, without remote control, for locomotion, manipulation, or sensing purposes. She has shown that these self-reconfigurable machines could be used in many situations where the possible obstacles and constraints on movement could not ever be fully anticipated in preprogrammed control software (e.g., deep sea or planetary exploration).[5]

Carlo Ratti

Carlo Ratti

An architect and engineer by training, Professor Carlo Ratti teaches at the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning, where he directs the Senseable City Lab. Carlo is also a founding partner of the international design and innovation office CRA – Carlo Ratti Associati and was involved in the launch of several companies in the USA and Europe.

Carlo graduated from the Politecnico di Torino, Italy, and the École des Ponts in Paris, France, and later earned his MPhil and PhD degrees at the University of Cambridge, UK. He initially joined MIT as a Fulbright Visiting Scholar in 2001, exploring how new technologies can enable a better integration between the natural and artificial worlds.

Three of Carlo’s projects have been included by TIME Magazine in the list of the ‘Best Inventions of the Year’. He has been featured in Esquire Magazine’s “Best and Brightest” list and in Wired Magazine’s “Smart List – 50 people who will change the world”. Blueprint Magazine included him among the “25 People who will Change the World of Design” and Fast Company named him as one of the “50 Most Influential Designers in America.

Manolis Kellis

Manolis Kellis

Manolis Kellis is a Professor of Computer Science at MIT, a member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab at MIT where he directs the MIT Computational Biology Group (compbio.mit.edu). His research is in disease genetics, epigenomics, gene circuitry, non-coding RNAs, comparative genomics, and phylogenetics.

He has authored more than 230 journal publications that have been cited more than 115,000 times. He has helped direct several large-scale genomics projects, including the Roadmap Epigenomics project, the comparative analysis of 29 mammals, the human and the Drosophila Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, and the Genotype Tissue-Expression (GTEx) project. He received the US Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE), the NSF CAREER award, the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship. He obtained his Ph.D. from MIT, where he received the Sprowls award for the best doctorate thesis in computer science. He lived in Greece and France before moving to the US.

Ramesh Raskar

Ramesh Raskar

Ramesh Raskar is an Associate Professor at MIT Media Lab and directs the Camera Culture research group. His focus is on Machine Learning and Imaging for health and sustainability. They span research in physical (e.g., sensors, health-tech), digital (e.g., automated and privacy-aware machine learning) and global (e.g., geomaps, autonomous mobility) domains.

At MIT, his co-inventions include camera to see around corners, femto-photography, automated machine learning (auto-ML), private ML (split-learning), low-cost eye care devices (Netra,Catra, EyeSelfie), a novel CAT-Scan machine, motion capture (Prakash), long distance barcodes (Bokode), 3D interaction displays (BiDi screen),  new theoretical models to augment light fields (ALF) to represent wave phenomena and algebraic rank constraints for 3D displays(HR3D). 

His work has appeared in NYTimes, CNN, BBC, NewScientist, TechnologyReview and several technology news websites. His invited and keynote talks include TED, Wired, TEDMED, Darpa Wait What, MIT Technology Review, Google SolveForX and several TEDx venues. His co-authored books include Spatial Augmented Reality,  Computational Photography, and 3D Imaging (under preparation).

 

S. Craig Watkins

S. Craig Watkins

S. Craig Watkins is the Ernest A. Sharpe Centennial Professor at the University of Texas at Austin and the Founding Director of the Institute for Media Innovation​. His research focuses on the impacts of media and data-based systems on human behavior, with a specific concentration on issues related to systemic racism. He is the author of six books and several articles and book chapters examining the intersections between race, technology, and society. His research also considers how diverse communities seek to adopt and deploy technology in innovative ways that address data literacy, civic life, and health. This work has been supported by the MacArthur Foundation.

Currently, Watkins is leading a team that will address the issue of artificial intelligence and systemic racism in a new six-year program funded by the Office of Vice President for Research at the University of Texas at Austin. The team will focus on the broad and fundamental scientific challenge of achieving racially equitable AI, while being grounded in testing the applicability of specific methods, models, processes, and procedures in critical domains like health and transportation. A key component of the research is to examine how various stakeholders—developers of technologies, the private and public sectors, and citizens—can work to create a more equitable AI future.

Tian Gu

Tian Gu

Tian Gu is a Research Scientist at MIT, where he is the co-Investigator of the Photonic Materials Research Group. His primary research interests involve nano-/micro-optics, integrated photonics, and photonic materials, focusing on the areas of metasurface flat optics, optical phase change materials, data communications, on-chip spectroscopy, photovoltaics, flexible photonics, etc. He is also the co-Founder and President of LyteChip Inc., an MIT spin-off company that develops advanced optics and photonics technologies. He received his B.S. degree from Beijing Institute of Technology in Electrical Engineering, and Ph.D. degree from University of Delaware in Electrical and Computer Engineering.

He is a topic chair of IEEE Summer Topicals Meeting on Reconfigurable Optics and Photonics and served on the conference program committees for CLEO, IEEE Photonics Conference, IEEE Optical Interconnects Conference, IEEE SENSORS, International Congress on Glass, International Conference on Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems, etc. He is a recipient of the SPIE Rising Researcher Award, R&D 100 Award, TechConnect National Innovation Award, among others.

Aleksander Madry

Aleksander Madry

Aleksander Madry is a Professor of Computer Science in the MIT EECS Department and a Principal Investigator in the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). He received his PhD from MIT in 2011 and, prior to joining the MIT faculty, he spent some time at Microsoft Research New England and on the faculty of EPFL.

Aleksander’s research interests span algorithms, continuous optimization, science of deep learning, and understanding machine learning from a robustness and deployability perspectives. His work has been recognized with a number of awards, including an NSF CAREER Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, an ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award Honorable Mention, and Presburger Award.

Marzyeh Ghassemi

Marzyeh Ghassemi

Marzyeh is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto in Computer Science and Medicine, and a Vector Institute faculty member holding a Canadian CIFAR AI Chair and Canada Research Chair. She joined MIT’s IMES/EECS in July 2021.

Marzyeh currently serves as a NeurIPS 2019 Workshop Co-Chair, and General Chair for the ACM Conference on Health, Inference and Learning (CHIL). Previously, she was a Visiting Researcher with Alphabet’s Verily and a post-doc with Peter Szolovits at MIT. Prior to her PhD in Computer Science at MIT, she received an MSc. degree in biomedical engineering from Oxford University as a Marshall Scholar, and B.S. degrees in computer science and electrical engineering as a Goldwater Scholar at New Mexico State University.

 

MIT Ohms

MIT Ohms

We are the Ohms, MIT’s electrifying competitive South Asian a cappella group!

Really, we’re a pretty awesome group of people who love punny statements and pride ourselves on having the lowest time commitment on campus. Nevertheless, we have received plenty of praise for our creative arrangements, vocal talent, and upbeat spirit. We have been featured at MIT’s 150th Anniversary celebrations, MIT Campus Preview Weekend, and at our very first concert (Ohms: Resistance) in March 2011.

For us, the Ohms are a family. Though we started as just a really cool idea in Date Room B in McCormick Hall, we are who we are today because of a team effort. Every member of the Ohms has left a lasting imprint on our group, and we have created so many memories together. We collaborate, we’re efficient, we’re fun. We’re a little bit nerdy and little bit crazy, but that is why we love each other. Above all else, we love to sing and celebrate the richness of our culture. We are the Ohms, MIT’s electrifying competitive South Asian a cappella group! 

Join Our Team

Speaker Applications

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Organizer Applications

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Contact

Interest Form

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Mail

tedxmit-officers@mit.edu

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